Action for Animals
angry-hippo:

"We know things about her that no one should ever know, or want to know, about a fellow being – the sight of her flayed body, the weight of her severed thigh, the taste of her burned, bone-punctured flesh, the charred crunch of her fractured ribs, the flavor of her spilled marrow, the taste, texture and flavor of every aspect of her despair, degradation and defeat.
We know every detail of what we have forced her to be – an object to consume and excrete. What we don’t know, what we don’t want to know, is what we must know if we are to restore our own humanity: who she is.”

From “The Sadness of Being Vegan.”

angry-hippo:

"We know things about her that no one should ever know, or want to know, about a fellow being – the sight of her flayed body, the weight of her severed thigh, the taste of her burned, bone-punctured flesh, the charred crunch of her fractured ribs, the flavor of her spilled marrow, the taste, texture and flavor of every aspect of her despair, degradation and defeat.

We know every detail of what we have forced her to be – an object to consume and excrete. What we don’t know, what we don’t want to know, is what we must know if we are to restore our own humanity: who she is.”

From “The Sadness of Being Vegan.”

Our banner today in Seattle’s Climate March! Remember though — a day of marches won’t save the planet or the animals on it. We have to consistently put in effort and take action for animals and the earth every day!

Our banner today in Seattle’s Climate March! Remember though — a day of marches won’t save the planet or the animals on it. We have to consistently put in effort and take action for animals and the earth every day!

funnywildlife:

A baby seal cautiously dips her head in freezing cold water as she goes swimming for the first time.
The two-week-old harp seal explores the environment in the -2 degree Celsius waters after jumping in from the ice.
Photographer Keith Monroe, travelled to the a floating ice pack in the Gulf of St Lawrence just off the Magdalen Islands, Canada.Picture: Keith Monroe/Solent News

funnywildlife:

A baby seal cautiously dips her head in freezing cold water as she goes swimming for the first time.

The two-week-old harp seal explores the environment in the -2 degree Celsius waters after jumping in from the ice.

Photographer Keith Monroe, travelled to the a floating ice pack in the Gulf of St Lawrence just off the Magdalen Islands, Canada.
Picture: Keith Monroe/Solent News

x

veganlove:

oh. my. goodness!

veganlove:

oh. my. goodness!

nubbsgalore:

three orphaned baby black rhinos — hope, kilifi and nicky — are being raised in kenya’s lewa wildlife conservancy by rangers who haven’t left their side since their mothers were killed by poachers. from a population that used to number in the hundreds of thousands only a century ago, less than 5,000 black rhinos now remain. photos by (click pic) luca ghidoni, suzi eszterhas and ami vitale. (similar posts)

smithsonian:

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 

smithsonian:

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction.

The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report